Music Monday/Movie Review – The Great Gatsby

Happy Music Monday. Since I didn’t love the soundtrack, here’s my stab at a Jazz Age ditty to listen to while you read my non-review review.
 
 
Okay, here is my take on the Great Gatsby.
But wait. I must preamble first:

I was beyond excited about this movie, but after seeing the first trailer, my heart tanked, and for the next 9 months, I put on an excited act when really, I was already heart-brokenly disappointed. I loved the book so much…it is visual enough, so why would we need all the flashy extravagance this director is known for? Again, ugh. (Obviously, all of this is IMO, so no hate mail, loves.) So yeah, I made plans with my girls to see it opening night, but not thrilled in the least. I love looking at Leo, so worst case scenario, I get to stare at him for 2.5 hours. Not too tragic. 

 But I digress…

Long story short–because I’m already bored with this non-review–I loved it. Almost like the book, it had me hook from the first page. Tobey was fine, a bit too tiny and pale for my personal vision of Nick Carroway, but I grew used to him quickly. Obviously, I was waiting for Leo. Not since The Third Man, had I looked so forward to a character making an appearance. And when Gatsby finally hit the screen, I was stunned. 

This is the point in the film when I actually whooped. I couldn’t help it! Sorry, other patrons of the 8:30 show at Tinseltown. I was at a Backstreet Boys concert, evidently
The over-the-top-visual scenes were fewer than expected and didn’t bother me as much as they could have. I know, I know, the Jazz Age was rather over-the-top, but you know what I mean. I didn’t care for the soundtrack either, and hoped there would be some updated Gershwin in there. But again, what did I expect knowing the director?

Visually, it was stunning. The colors and costumes and hair dos were wonderful. The special effects were lost on me, so I won’t go into how cool the (cartoon) house looked. I’d heard a few reviews saying the two leads had no chemistry. I must disagree. I think I would sell my own sweet granny to be pressed against that oak tree with Leo. So yeah, the acting was stellar.

ENDING SPOILER (if you haven’t read the novel, shame on you):
When Gatsby was sinking to the bottom of the pool, lifeless, my girl friend and I turned to each other. She muttered, “Titanic,” and I muttered, “Jack, I’ll never let go.” Also at the end, we see another flash of Gatsby, all pressed suit and gorgeous, also a bit too Titanic-y, like when we see Jack at the top of the stairs, all non-dead.

Anyway, blah-blah-blah, I was wrong, Leo. Your movie was greatness, and I know it took me a decade to forgive you for Romeo+Juliet, I hope it doesn’t take you a decade to forgive me. ❤ 

Music Monday/Movie Review – The Great Gatsby

Happy Music Monday. Since I didn’t love the soundtrack, here’s my stab at a Jazz Age ditty to listen to while you read my non-review review.
 
 
Okay, here is my take on the Great Gatsby.
But wait. I must preamble first:

I was beyond excited about this movie, but after seeing the first trailer, my heart tanked, and for the next 9 months, I put on an excited act when really, I was already heart-brokenly disappointed. I loved the book so much…it is visual enough, so why would we need all the flashy extravagance this director is known for? Again, ugh. (Obviously, all of this is IMO, so no hate mail, loves.) So yeah, I made plans with my girls to see it opening night, but not thrilled in the least. I love looking at Leo, so worst case scenario, I get to stare at him for 2.5 hours. Not too tragic. 

 But I digress…

Long story short–because I’m already bored with this non-review–I loved it. Almost like the book, it had me hook from the first page. Tobey was fine, a bit too tiny and pale for my personal vision of Nick Carroway, but I grew used to him quickly. Obviously, I was waiting for Leo. Not since The Third Man, had I looked so forward to a character making an appearance. And when Gatsby finally hit the screen, I was stunned. 

This is the point in the film when I actually whooped. I couldn’t help it! Sorry, other patrons of the 8:30 show at Tinseltown. I was at a Backstreet Boys concert, evidently
The over-the-top-visual scenes were fewer than expected and didn’t bother me as much as they could have. I know, I know, the Jazz Age was rather over-the-top, but you know what I mean. I didn’t care for the soundtrack either, and hoped there would be some updated Gershwin in there. But again, what did I expect knowing the director?

Visually, it was stunning. The colors and costumes and hair dos were wonderful. The special effects were lost on me, so I won’t go into how cool the (cartoon) house looked. I’d heard a few reviews saying the two leads had no chemistry. I must disagree. I think I would sell my own sweet granny to be pressed against that oak tree with Leo. So yeah, the acting was stellar.

ENDING SPOILER (if you haven’t read the novel, shame on you):
When Gatsby was sinking to the bottom of the pool, lifeless, my girl friend and I turned to each other. She muttered, “Titanic,” and I muttered, “Jack, I’ll never let go.” Also at the end, we see another flash of Gatsby, all pressed suit and gorgeous, also a bit too Titanic-y, like when we see Jack at the top of the stairs, all non-dead.

Anyway, blah-blah-blah, I was wrong, Leo. Your movie was greatness, and I know it took me a decade to forgive you for Romeo+Juliet, I hope it doesn’t take you a decade to forgive me. ❤ 

Greatness

Read the novel for the first time last year. Review(ish) here. Seeing the new movie tonight. Review to come.

I am seriously in love with this story and already know the film will be a disappointment, just because my expectations are sky-high. I’ve tried to shy away from hearing reviews, but walking around in pubic, some have seeped in. So far, the reviews haven’t been stellar, but I’m hopeful. At the very least, I get to stare at Leo for two and a half hours without feeling like an oogy stalker. So how bad is that, right?

Greatness

Read the novel for the first time last year. Review(ish) here. Seeing the new movie tonight. Review to come.

I am seriously in love with this story and already know the film will be a disappointment, just because my expectations are sky-high. I’ve tried to shy away from hearing reviews, but walking around in pubic, some have seeped in. So far, the reviews haven’t been stellar, but I’m hopeful. At the very least, I get to stare at Leo for two and a half hours without feeling like an oogy stalker. So how bad is that, right?

Review: "I Think I Love You" by Allison Pearson

DISCLAIMER: I do not do book reviews. (Clicky HERE to see why.)
But the book I just finished is so special, that instead of pulling everyone in the world aside to rave about it, I thought I would try my hand at a review. (Heaven help us all.)

“I Think I Love You” by Allison Pearson

Publisher: Knopf (February 8, 2011)

Pages: 336

Format: Audiobook
This is a story told from two points of view–which I sometimes find annoying. 
The story opens in 1974 with Petra, a thirteen-year-old girl from Wales. . .who is OBSESSED with David Cassidy. Her favorite thing to do–besides play her cello in secret–is lay around her best friend Sharon’s bedroom and read “The Ultimate David Cassidy” magazine. The best part of this mag is the personal letter written directly to the fans from David himself.  Petra and Sharon feel like they actual know David….deep down. They know he loves horses and his favorite color is brown and his favorite food is. . . .

The parallel story is twenty-two-year-old Bill, who has just landed his first real journalist job in London, writing for (embarrassingly enough!) “The Ultimate David Cassidy” magazine. Bill has never met David, never listened to his music, never seen The Partridge Family. Yet Bill is put in charge of writing those “personal” letters from David. After eighteen months of this, Bill sometimes feels like he IS David Cassidy. Bill’s favorite color is brown. Bill’s favorite food is. . . .
Fast forward twenty-five years. The inevitable colliding of these two (or is it three?) people is delightfully nail-biting. And the end result was satisfying beyond words.

That’s all I’m going to tell you about the plot. Because I’m not about to spoil the surprises.

Here is what I LOVED about this book:
David Cassidy was a generation before my time. In fact, I’d never heard of him until I was in college. (Thank you, VH1 and your “I Love the 70’s” series!) However, the brilliance of this story is how I was able to simply replace the name David Cassidy with say, Michael Jackson and later, Jordan Knights, and I was right there with Petra. The crying, the longing, the loving, the music, the believing-every-word-in-the-mags, the kissing-his-poster-to-bed-every-night. I did all of that, as I’m sure millions of other teenaged girls did. The emotions were so real and so fun and so heartbreaking. 
I knew this girl, because I WAS this girl.
He is dreamy, rather.
Beside all of this, the writing is beautiful and clean and descriptive. And I would highly recommend the audio version because the narrator (Sain Thomas) totally kills the lilting Welsh accent (as well as British, German and American). She doesn’t, however, do any of the singing, leading me to find so many David Cassidy treasures on youtube. . .which has been great fun, since the only song I knew before this book was its namesake. 
Four out of five stars. (It would’ve been five had it been about the Backstreet Boys.)

Who was your teenage crush? I told you mine. . . . .