Rockin’ that list, yo

If you need a refresher. . . clicky-click HERE for the LIST 
Now, for the progress:



#1 Eat in a restaurant alone

French souffle at Rise No 1
“Marshmallow Soup”
Ham & Cheese sans a few bites

“Jambon & Guyere”
Hazelnut with chocolate sauce
 

#16 Eat something exotic
Did I mention the French souffle? 
(Which I obviously hated.)

#13 Make a new friend
I’ve made two, actually. (I’m an over-achiever, I know.) 
One who set me up on a date. 
Another who took me on a date.


 #36 Live vegetarian for three weeks

I went vegan. And I did just fine, very nearly perfect, in fact. (Okay, so I might’ve had a wee bit of dairy. But I’m NOT going to send spaghetti back because my waiter didn’t make a note when I asked for no cheese.) I’ve been keeping it up for the past few weeks since; less hardcore, however.

#7 Make a chocolate cake from scratch

See non-staged photographic progress.

 

No comment on how good it “tasted.” The exercise was to “make” it. So. . . .

Rockin’ that list, yo

If you need a refresher. . . clicky-click HERE for the LIST 
Now, for the progress:



#1 Eat in a restaurant alone

French souffle at Rise No 1
“Marshmallow Soup”
Ham & Cheese sans a few bites

“Jambon & Guyere”
Hazelnut with chocolate sauce
 

#16 Eat something exotic
Did I mention the French souffle? 
(Which I obviously hated.)

#13 Make a new friend
I’ve made two, actually. (I’m an over-achiever, I know.) 
One who set me up on a date. 
Another who took me on a date.


 #36 Live vegetarian for three weeks

I went vegan. And I did just fine, very nearly perfect, in fact. (Okay, so I might’ve had a wee bit of dairy. But I’m NOT going to send spaghetti back because my waiter didn’t make a note when I asked for no cheese.) I’ve been keeping it up for the past few weeks since; less hardcore, however.

#7 Make a chocolate cake from scratch

See non-staged photographic progress.

 

No comment on how good it “tasted.” The exercise was to “make” it. So. . . .

Musical Pleasures

Thanks to my parents and older siblings, music was always playing in our house. (Like this, this & this.) We took piano lessons and we each learned a different musical instrument. And most of us were at least semi-talented vocally. We were HUGE music lovers and appreciators, if nothing else. Plus, there were those Rodgers & Hammerstein and Hayley Mills movie musicals that played practically non-stop on at least one TV set.

Ergo, my obsession with music developed pretty early. I wore the grooves off “Sneaky Snake” and “Hound Dog” by the time I was eight. (Incidentally, not until I was much older, did I realize that this version of “Hound Dog,” was not by Elvis, but was a cover by “The Big Bop” – not to be confused with The Big Bopper.) 

I made my first “mix tape” when I was ten. It was a 60-minute Memorex with a black label, with songs recorded straight from the radio, complete with the beginnings and ends cut off, as well as the radio DJ’s talking over the intros.

Earlier today, I had a particular song on repeat. After a while, I wondered how many times it had played. Thanks to the wonders of  iTunes, the number of times an individual track is played is actually recorded and stored as part of your library. Curious, I checked out my tracks in the order of the number of plays. The list was not surprising. But it got me thinking. . . . 
If I’d had access to such a “counter” my entire life, what songs would’ve been played the most? 
Interesting idea. 
So I thought back to the major chunks of my life, remembering what songs were important to me. Meaning, what music did I play over and over and over until the tape broke? 

In chronological order, here are the songs that would probably be at the very tip-top of my iTunes “plays” counter list during my formative years:
Elementary School:
The Lonely Goatherd – The Sound of Music
Billy Jean – Michael Jackson 
Junior High:
High School:
Monkey – George Michael
Pour Some Sugar on Me – Def Leppard 
Lost in your Eyes – Debbie Gibson
College:

And just because I love lists so much (and in the spirit of full, embarrassing disclosure), here are the songs that compile my current Top Ten Most Played, according to iTunes:


I’m curious. What do you think is on the top of YOUR most-played “iTunes of all times” list? 
Do share. . . .

Musical Pleasures

Thanks to my parents and older siblings, music was always playing in our house. (Like this, this & this.) We took piano lessons and we each learned a different musical instrument. And most of us were at least semi-talented vocally. We were HUGE music lovers and appreciators, if nothing else. Plus, there were those Rodgers & Hammerstein and Hayley Mills movie musicals that played practically non-stop on at least one TV set.

Ergo, my obsession with music developed pretty early. I wore the grooves off “Sneaky Snake” and “Hound Dog” by the time I was eight. (Incidentally, not until I was much older, did I realize that this version of “Hound Dog,” was not by Elvis, but was a cover by “The Big Bop” – not to be confused with The Big Bopper.) 

I made my first “mix tape” when I was ten. It was a 60-minute Memorex with a black label, with songs recorded straight from the radio, complete with the beginnings and ends cut off, as well as the radio DJ’s talking over the intros.

Earlier today, I had a particular song on repeat. After a while, I wondered how many times it had played. Thanks to the wonders of  iTunes, the number of times an individual track is played is actually recorded and stored as part of your library. Curious, I checked out my tracks in the order of the number of plays. The list was not surprising. But it got me thinking. . . . 
If I’d had access to such a “counter” my entire life, what songs would’ve been played the most? 
Interesting idea. 
So I thought back to the major chunks of my life, remembering what songs were important to me. Meaning, what music did I play over and over and over until the tape broke? 

In chronological order, here are the songs that would probably be at the very tip-top of my iTunes “plays” counter list during my formative years:
Elementary School:
The Lonely Goatherd – The Sound of Music
Billy Jean – Michael Jackson 
Junior High:
High School:
Monkey – George Michael
Pour Some Sugar on Me – Def Leppard 
Lost in your Eyes – Debbie Gibson
College:

And just because I love lists so much (and in the spirit of full, embarrassing disclosure), here are the songs that compile my current Top Ten Most Played, according to iTunes:


I’m curious. What do you think is on the top of YOUR most-played “iTunes of all times” list? 
Do share. . . .

40 Little Things

 (on April 18, 2012)
(which gives me seven months…starting……..now!)

(you remember him, the handyman from “One Day at a Time”)
(Currently, I don’t even own a cake pan)
8. Run the stadium stairs
(ouch)
(double ouch)
(writing, of course)
(Eek! Be brave, Mary!)
15. Take on a new leadership responsibility at work
(sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen! We’re not 20 anymore–ergo: #5)
(I’m thinking Austin)
21. Visit a new place in California
(I’m thinking Yosemite)
23. Make ricotta cheese
24. Learn to do a Sudoku puzzle
25. Go on a date with a 25-year-old one last time Recycle
(no TV, no radio, no iPod, no computer. Learn to live in the silence more often)
(magazines, email catalogs, facebook “likes”)
29. Have a “Day at the Angelika”
30. Wear false eyelashes
31. Renew my passport
32. Volunteer at a soup kitchen
(or something else in the community)
(this could be literally or figuratively)
37. Take a long walk in the rain without an umbrella
38. Upgrade jewelry
39. Sleep under the stars
40. Ride in a limo Own my own handgun and CHL

40 Little Things

 (on April 18, 2012)
(which gives me seven months…starting……..now!)

(you remember him, the handyman from “One Day at a Time”)
(Currently, I don’t even own a cake pan)
8. Run the stadium stairs
(ouch)
(double ouch)
(writing, of course)
(Eek! Be brave, Mary!)
15. Take on a new leadership responsibility at work
(sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen! We’re not 20 anymore–ergo: #5)
(I’m thinking Austin)
21. Visit a new place in California
(I’m thinking Yosemite)
23. Make ricotta cheese
24. Learn to do a Sudoku puzzle
25. Go on a date with a 25-year-old one last time Recycle
(no TV, no radio, no iPod, no computer. Learn to live in the silence more often)
(magazines, email catalogs, facebook “likes”)
29. Have a “Day at the Angelika”
30. Wear false eyelashes
31. Renew my passport
32. Volunteer at a soup kitchen
(or something else in the community)
(this could be literally or figuratively)
37. Take a long walk in the rain without an umbrella
38. Upgrade jewelry
39. Sleep under the stars
40. Ride in a limo Own my own handgun and CHL
Very Useful Rules for Living, by Olivia Joules
1. Never panic. Stop, breathe, think.
2. No one is thinking about you. They’re thinking about themselves, just like you.
3. Never change haircut or color before an important event.
4. Nothing is either as bad or as good as it seems.
5. Do as you would be done by, e.g. thou shalt not kill.
6. It is better to buy one expensive thing that you really like than several cheap ones that you only quite like.
7. Hardly anything matters: if you get upset, ask yourself, “Does it really matter?”
8. The key to success lies in how you pick yourself up from failure.
9. Be honest and kind.
10. Only buy clothes that make you feel like doing a small dance.
11. Trust your instincts, not your overactive imagination.
12. When overwhelmed by disaster, check if it’s really a disaster by doing the following: (a) think, “oh, screw it,” (b) look on the bright side and, if that doesn’t work, look on the funny side.
If neither of the above works then maybe it is a disaster so turn to items 1 and 4.
13. Don’t expect the world to be safe or life to be fair.
14. Sometimes you just have to go with the flow.
15. Don’t regret anything. Remember that wasn’t anything else that could have happened, given who you were and the state of the world at the moment. The only thing you can change is the present, so learn from the past.
16. If you start regretting something and thinking, “I should have done…” always add, “but then I might have been run over by a lorry or blown up by a Japanese-manned torpedo.”
She’s so wise, that Olivia Joules. And fearless.
Borrowed from Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination, by the ever fabulous Helen Fielding, who also brought us Bridget Jones.
Very Useful Rules for Living, by Olivia Joules
1. Never panic. Stop, breathe, think.
2. No one is thinking about you. They’re thinking about themselves, just like you.
3. Never change haircut or color before an important event.
4. Nothing is either as bad or as good as it seems.
5. Do as you would be done by, e.g. thou shalt not kill.
6. It is better to buy one expensive thing that you really like than several cheap ones that you only quite like.
7. Hardly anything matters: if you get upset, ask yourself, “Does it really matter?”
8. The key to success lies in how you pick yourself up from failure.
9. Be honest and kind.
10. Only buy clothes that make you feel like doing a small dance.
11. Trust your instincts, not your overactive imagination.
12. When overwhelmed by disaster, check if it’s really a disaster by doing the following: (a) think, “oh, screw it,” (b) look on the bright side and, if that doesn’t work, look on the funny side.
If neither of the above works then maybe it is a disaster so turn to items 1 and 4.
13. Don’t expect the world to be safe or life to be fair.
14. Sometimes you just have to go with the flow.
15. Don’t regret anything. Remember that wasn’t anything else that could have happened, given who you were and the state of the world at the moment. The only thing you can change is the present, so learn from the past.
16. If you start regretting something and thinking, “I should have done…” always add, “but then I might have been run over by a lorry or blown up by a Japanese-manned torpedo.”
She’s so wise, that Olivia Joules. And fearless.
Borrowed from Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination, by the ever fabulous Helen Fielding, who also brought us Bridget Jones.